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  I love it when I’m introduced to writers I’ve never read before, especially when I know they’re going to be new friends. That’s the case with Joseph Knox. The Sleepwalker, which is published this month by Doubleday, is the third outing for Detective Aidan Waits and yet it’s my introduction to him. I really … Continue readings

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    Longlisted for the Women’s Prize 2019, Yvonne Battle-Felton’s novel Remembered is a book of many stories. In 1910 Philadelphia, central character Spring sits by the hospital bed of her dying son. Edmund is accused of driving a streetcar into a ‘no coloreds’ department store. As Spring watches him, the ghost of her dead … Continue readings

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  Today, we’re delighted to have wonderful Louise Voss with us in The Literary Lounge, talking all things music and writerly. Louise is the author of 13 books, including The Old You (2018), published by indie press Orenda Books to huge critical acclaim. We loved, loved, loved, loved it and so, of course, are beside … Continue readings

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  Many authors have turned to writing after suffering from PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder), creating beauty and peace while ‘struggling with a torn mind’, as Karl Tearney phrases it so eloquently in the introduction to his collection of poems, Second Life. A former pilot in the British Army Air Corp, Tearney joined up as … Continue readings

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  We’re huge fans of JD Robb’s Eve Dallas–Roarke futuristic crime series, especially as they just get better over time. Connections in Death builds on Dallas’ ever-growing family, seeing familiar and beloved characters go through extremely challenging and bloody times only to rise stronger than before. As always, Robb creates a fast-paced, detailed and carefully … Continue readings

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      The premise for Amy Lord’s debut novel The Disappeared is an attractive one – that reading the ‘wrong’ book, having the ‘wrong’ thoughts, can get you arrested. It’s an idea that’s been explored before very successfully in novels like Ray Bradbury’s wonderful Fahrenheit 451. In this incarnation, we’re in a dystopian Britain, … Continue readings

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  There’s a moment in Stephanie Butland’s The Woman in the Photograph, when protagonist Veronica Moon is remembering Leonie Barratt, a woman at the forefront of the women’s movement and the friend who changed her life. She says, ‘We let her down because we didn’t see that she was right. If we had listened to … Continue readings

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  As a former scriptwriter, Candy Denman is well versed in setting a scene quickly, as seen in popular dramas like The Bill and Heartbeat. Her books are no different, well drawn, tightly plotted and fast-paced. In #YouToo, the third outing for protagonist Dr Jocasta Hughes, we are immersed in her world from the very … Continue readings

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  It’s no surprise that Keep You Close, the new book from former FBI agent-turned-author Karen Cleveland, has been so highly anticipated. Need to Know, her debut novel, was a runaway success, going to auction, critically received on publication and optioned for the big screen. The central premise of this new novel is how far … Continue readings

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  Early on in Sarah Henstra’s The Red Word, protagonist Karen wakes up in ‘someone’s backyard’, wearing ‘boxer shorts, one turquoise jelly sandal’ and ‘no bra’. She tells Steph, the woman who finds her, that she’s had sex. ‘On purpose?’ Steph asks. ‘There was a frat party,’ she responds. The party was at GBC (Gamma … Continue readings

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  Tim Lott’s new novel, When We Were Rich, published today by Scribner, revisits the main characters of Whitbread-winner White City Blue. Opening just before the Millennium, in Blair’s Britain, we are reunited with Frankie Blue and old mates Nodge and Colin, with Diamond Tony lurking in the background. It ends in 2008, when the … Continue readings

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  We’re far too big for Italy. Big and white and blond, we barely fit around the table at the restaurant that evening. The furniture and interiors have been designed with trim little Italians in mind, not Dad and Håkon, both almost six feet four inches tall; not for such long arms and legs; not … Continue readings