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Shalini Boland’s latest offering, The Other Daughter, focuses on every parent’s worst nightmare, the abduction of their child. But what do you do if you come face to face with that child years later as someone else’s daughter?

From the opening pages, Boland’s plot is fast-paced. We’re thrown into the action, immersed in mother Rachel’s horror when her two-year-old child, Holly, disappears in the blink of an eye, while they’re out at a local mall. Roll on nine years and Rachel’s managed to move on. She’s in a different loving relationship and has children and yet, of course, Holly is always there on her mind. Then one day, Holly seemingly is there as Bella, the daughter of a couple new to town. Or is she?

Through the plot and subplots, Boland asks her readers heartrending questions: what would they do if they were Rachel? How would they react? But at the heart of it all is whether Bella is in fact Holly. Or is it merely a case of mistaken identity? Wishful thinking on Rachel’s part so that she can get what she ultimately desires most, Holly back. Or is it something altogether more sinister?

A novel with several twists, with a few plot turns that are a little confusing, The Other Daughter is an extremely entertaining read. Definitely a page-turner.

 

The Other Daughter | Shalini Boland | Bookouture | 5 November 2019 | digital and paperback |

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Acknowledgements: This review is published as part of the publisher virtual book tour. Please check out the other participants. Many thanks to Sarah Hardy, Kim Nash and Noelle Holton at Bookouture for the digital copy and jacket image. All opinions are our own. All rights reserved.

 

Also of interest: ‘Debbie Rix’s The Secret Letter’; ‘By Grand Central Station I Sat Down and Wept’; ‘Permission by Saskia Vogel‘; ‘The Revolution Will Not Be Televised‘;‘We should all be feminists‘; The not-so-invisible woman: 150 greats in their own words’; ‘How Penguin learned to fly – Allen Lane and the Original “Penguin Ten”‘; Dorothy L. Sayer’s Busman’s Holiday – Romek Marber for Penguin Crime (book covers we love).

This review is © 2019 by The Literary Shed. All rights reserved. All opinions are our own. We welcome your feedback and comments. If you wish to reproduce this piece, please do contact us to request permission. Thank you so much.

 

 

 

 

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