read

0 Comments

    Shed No Tears, Caz Frear’s latest novel, is our first foray into the world of DC Cat Kinsella. The third in the series featuring the detective, this book can also be read as a standalone. When the remains of a young woman are discovered in Cambridgeshire, Cat is assigned the case, along with … Continue readings

0 Comments

    In How To Be Nowhere, Tim MacGabhann’s new novel, published by W&N this month, we catch up with Irish journalist and recovering addict Andrew, introduced to us in the author’s debut work. This Andrew is a different man to the protagonist of Call Him Mine. He’s adjusting to life, sober, with a new … Continue readings

Tags : , , , , , ,

0 Comments

Our first foray into international best-selling novelist Michel Bussi’s work, Never Forget, published in the UK by W&N, doesn’t disappoint. Literary crime at its best, it opens with a report from a lieutenant of the National Gendarmerie requesting help with an investigation, after a rockfall west of Yport in Normandy reveals the skeletons of three … Continue readings

0 Comments

    ‘In a world that is increasingly dark and aggressive, I think making beauty is an act of rebellion and that’s what I’m trying to do really,’ says author and illustrator Jackie Morris of The Unwindings. And she does it most successfully in this gorgeously produced book. A pillow book, compact enough to be … Continue readings

Tags : , , , , ,

0 Comments

  ‘Where does a mistake begin?’ Juliet Partlow asks at the beginning of Amity Gaige’s novel, Sea Wife. ‘… Did my mistake begin with the boat? Or my marriage itself?’ And from that very first page, we know that something terrible has happened. The Partlows are a normal couple, living in the suburbs, with their … Continue readings

Tags : , , , , ,

0 Comments

  When I first heard the premise for Amanda Craig’s new novel, The Golden Rule, I was intrigued. Two women meet on a train, talk and agree to kill each other’s husbands. It’s Strangers on the Train revisited surely? As a huge Hitchcock and Highsmith fan that’s wonderful. It’s even more so to discover the … Continue readings

Tags : , , , , , , ,

0 Comments

  From the very page, A J Park’s The First Lie captures our attention. It’s highly readable, fast-paced, with an interesting premise: how far would you go to protect the people and things most important to you? When barrister Paul Reeve comes home after a particularly gruelling day, he finds a dead body draped over … Continue readings

Tags : , , , , ,

0 Comments

    What Doesn’t Kill You, fifteen essays by a diverse group of commentators, writers, actors, journalists, explorers, among them, is an insightful look at the beauty of the human spirit. It’s often not an easy read, but it is a necessary one, and there are some lovely pieces, beautifully penned, poignant, moving. Ones that … Continue readings

Tags : , , , , , , , , , , , ,

0 Comments

  I was looking at the book jacket of Damian Barr’s You Will Be Safe Here a few days back, when I reread it, and was struck by how many adjectives have been applied to it by so many great writers, so you’ll forgive me if I repeat some of them in the course of … Continue readings

Tags : , , , , , , , , ,

0 Comments

    There’s a great sense of nostalgia and loss pervading Tara Gould’s short story, The Haunting of Strawberry Water, published by Myriad Editions as a small format paperback. Paying more than a nod to the Gothic tradition, from the very first words, we are made aware of the narrator’s longing for the mother she … Continue readings

Tags : , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

0 Comments

    The Split, best-selling author Sharon (SJ) Bolton’s new novel, features one of the best of crime-fiction locations, the island of South Georgia, the Antarctic, several hundred miles from the Falkland Islands, where protagonist Dr Felicity Lloyd discovers that sometimes it doesn’t matter how far you run, you just can’t hide. Especially from psycho … Continue readings

Tags : , , , , , , , ,

0 Comments

    We are, as we’ve said before, partial to a good piece of historical fiction and Ellen Alpsten’s debut novel, Tsarina, is a veritable beast of a book. Told in the first person, it charts the rise of Catherine I, second wife of Peter the Great, from her humble beginnings as peasant girl Marta … Continue readings

Tags : , , , , , , , , ,

0 Comments

    Caroline Hulse’s latest book, Like A House on Fire, is an incisive, incredibly funny study of how families behave in crisis. Told from multiple perspectives, the book revolves around a family party, a wedding anniversary with a murder–mystery theme, where pretty much every person has a secret which he or she is guarding, … Continue readings

Tags : , , , , , ,

0 Comments

  We’re huge Nora Roberts’ fans and are slightly ashamed to admit we came late to the table to her alter ego JD Robb and the fabulous Eve Dallas–Roarke futuristic crime series. Once we discovered them, we rushed through them as we’re also great crime-fiction lovers. Golden in Death, the latest – and fiftieth, fiftieth … Continue readings

Tags : , , , , , , , , , ,

0 Comments

  Every year I get myself a present from my late mama. Something that’s meaningful, occasionally life changing, like the flat I bought and moved into on my birthday four years ago. Mostly though it’s a set of charcoals or a plant. This year it’s Charlie Mackesy’s The Boy, The Mole, The Fox and the … Continue readings

Tags : , , , , , ,