the literary lounge

0 Comments

  Keith Carter’s The Umbrella Man is an insightful and often amusing insight into the global economy and financial crisis of the late noughties and the repercussions that seemingly unrelated decisions can have on our lives. Central character Peter Mount is CEO of Rareterre, a small mining company based in London. When a group of … Continue readings

Tags : , , , , , ,

0 Comments

  Foxfire, Wolfskin and Other Stories of Shapeshifting Women is a beautifully produced book, showcasing Sharon Blackie’s rather terrific tales. Drawing on global female folklore and mythology – from the familiar Snow Queen, immortalised by Hans Christian Andersen, to Croatia’s ‘she wolf’, with its similarities to the Celtic selkies, Slavic Baba Yaga, the creator-goddess turned … Continue readings

0 Comments

  We love Tom Cox. He’s rapidly become a favourite author, his writing poignant, funny, entertaining. Like many, we first encountered him via his musings on the much missed The Bear and his other fabulous felines. His subject matter is wide-ranging, from music to witches, toads to his shouty dad. His latest book, Ring the … Continue readings

Tags : , , , , , , , , ,

0 Comments

    Icon n. – person or thing regarded as a representative symbol or as worthy of veneration.”     ‘ICON’ IS PROBABLY ONE OF THE MOST OVER-USED WORDS in the English language. We apply it with little thought or reason. Yet there are a handful of truly iconic figures – the legend that is … Continue readings

Tags : , , , , , , ,

0 Comments

  Become a private investigator. One day taster course for anyone considering a career change but who doesn’t know what being a private investigator might entail. Why not find out if you have what it takes.”   As Death by Indulgence opens, AB Morgan’s protagonist, Ella, is struggling, juggling jobs that seem to be going … Continue readings

Tags : , , , , , ,

0 Comments

  James Essinger’s Writing Fiction is a user-friendly guide to, well, doing what it says on the tin. In twenty-four concise chapters, the author shepherds his readers through the writing process, breaking it down into easy, bite-size chunks. Posing the initial question ‘what is fiction?’, Essinger moves on to comment on important areas of writing … Continue readings

Tags : , , ,

0 Comments

  Stacey Halls’ much lauded debut The Familiars is a vividly told piece of historical fiction. It takes its name from the ‘helpful demonic companions’, usually small animals, said to help witches do their magic. Based on the real-life witch hunts of early seventeenth-century Pendle, The Familiars follows plucky protagonist seventeen-year-old Fleetwood Shuttleworth, the mistress … Continue readings

0 Comments

  Today, we’re delighted to welcome author and publisher Amanda Saint to The Literary Lounge. Amanda is the founder of Retreat West, a creative writing organisation and independent publisher. Her dystopian climate change novel, Remember Tomorrow, was published earlier this year.  First of all, welcome, Amanda. Thanks so much for joining us.   LS: Amanda, … Continue readings

Tags : , , , , , , ,

0 Comments

  On 23 June 1919, seven exceptional women gathered at 46 Dover Street in London’s Mayfair to do something that had never been done before – to create a professional organisation dedicated to campaigning for women’s rights. It was the official birth of the Women’s Engineering Society, the fruit of an idea conceived  several months … Continue readings

Tags : , , , ,

0 Comments

  The first thing that struck me about Tot Taylor’s The Story of John Nightly is that it is BIG. Seriously big. 896 pages big. A good-looking edition, with a great typographical cover, it’s a true doorstop of a book in the vein of old classics like War and Peace, to which it’s been compared … Continue readings

Tags : , , ,

0 Comments

  We’ve already waxed lyrical about the IWM’s republishing of four Second World War literary classics this month. By doing so, it’s giving voice to men and women who wrote so beautifully and poignantly about a great, brutal war. David Piper’s extraordinary Trial By Battle is the second book we’re reviewing and it is quite … Continue readings

Tags : , , , , , , , , , , ,

0 Comments

  Gosh, hats off to the Imperial War Museum for great publishing with the wartime classics series. We’ve already reviewed two of the four novels being republished by the IWM this month. Now, with great pleasure, we’ve become acquainted with Anthony Quayle’s very fine and highly entertaining adventure Eight Hours to England. Based on Quayle’s … Continue readings

Tags : , , , , , , , , , ,

0 Comments

  There’s a lovely moment In the Absence of Miracles, when Michael J. Malone’s protagonist is catching up with a childhood friend whom he hasn’t seen in an age, and the residual awkwardness that one quite often feels in such circumstances just falls away. ‘There we sat, with legs kicking the side. The years fell … Continue readings

Tags : , , , , , ,

0 Comments

    Today, we’re delighted to welcome to the Literary Lounge acclaimed writer AUSMA ZEHANAT KHAN, creator of the award-winning Esa Khattak and Rachel Getty series. Ausma holds a doctorate in international human rights law and each book highlights a different global human rights issue. No Place of Refuge, the fourth book featuring this Toronto-based … Continue readings

Tags : , , , , ,

0 Comments

  We have a great fondness for cult 60s’ TV series, like The Persuaders, The Champions, and so on, partly because they were so slick – full of beautiful people, great locales, lovely styling, witty dialogue and wonderful music scores, usually by John Barry – and partly because we binge watched them on DVD, trying … Continue readings

Tags : , , , , , ,